Tuesday, July 21, 2015

Louis Halphen

We have had an inquiry from a researcher in Houston about the Louis Halphen Post of the American Legion, which was mentioned here.
http://kerrvillegenealogy.blogspot.com/2014/12/first-world-war-ii-vets-to-apply-for.html
She wanted to know if the Louis Halphen mentioned here was related to her grandfather of the same name who was a World War II veteran.

Because of her question, we did some research to learn more about Louis Halphen.

Here’s what we know.  The Louis Halphen Post of the American Legion at the Legion Hospital was created in the fall of 1923. It existed at least by 8 November 1923, when it was mentioned in the Kerrville Mountain Sun newspaper.  The last mention in the newspaper was November 7, 1984.
An item in the 22 December 1957, Kerrville Daily Times reads “[James S.] Colley has just paid his American Legion dues for the 40th consecutive year—the entire life-span of the Legion to date.  He has kept our Louis Halphen Legion Post activated almost singlehandedly since 1950 as we have had no meeting place in the new hospital since then.” 

Kerrville Mountain Sun 20 June 20 1950.  “The first [patient] death to occur [at Legion Hospital] was Louis Halphen, a member of the American Legion, and the Post of that organization was named for him.”

Louis Alseid Halphen was born 1895, died 6 September 1923 at Legion, Kerr County, of tuberculosis, and is buried at the Oakwood Cemetery Annex, Austin, Travis Co. TX. He was a veteran of World War I.
His death certificate has no information about family, but he appears in the 1910 Census for Austin, Travis Co., Texas,  in the household of his grandparents Henry and Louisa Wollbrecht.

We have located the following news item in the 16 May 1918 Ada [OK] Weekly News.
Fort Worth, Texas, May 9--Nine men at Camp Bowie are dead and eight others are more or less seriously injured as a result of the explosion of a Stokes mortar at the trench system near Benbrook this afternoon at 3:10 o'clock.  ...
Sergeant Louis A. Halphen of Austin [was] seriously wounded and [was] not expected to survive.
He did survive, only to die five years later of tuberculosis.
We do not know the relationship of the two Louis Halphens--the one in World War I and the one in World War II, but have asked the researcher to let us know what she learns so we can add to our genealogy files.  It is inquiries like this that help us to build our collections.

Tuesday, July 7, 2015

KGS not affected by temporary closing of Kerr Regional History Center

The City of Kerrville has announced that the Kerr Regional History Center, located at 425 Water Street, will be closed for repairs from July 15 to about August 4, 2015.

This closing does not affect the Kerrville Genealogical Society, which is located at 125 Lehmann Drive and is not associated with the Kerr Regional History Center.  We will be open for business during our usual hours of Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday, 10 a.m.- 4 p.m.  Come see us!